Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Sequoia National Forest California as Travel Destinations

By Liliana Usvat
Blog 314-365

Sequoia National Forest History


 
 










Sequoia National Forest was established on July 1, 1908 from a portion of Sierra Forest Reserve. On March 2, 1909 Theodore Roosevelt added land by Presidential Proclamation. On July 1, 1910 1,951,191 acres (7,896.19 km2) was removed from the forest to create the Kern National Forest. This land was returned to Sequoia National Forest on July 1, 1915.
 
On April 15, 2000, President William J. Clinton proclaimed the establishment of the Giant Sequoia National Monument and made his announcement beneath one of the giant trees at the Trail of 100 Giants. 
 
The grove contains approximately 125 giant sequoias greater than 10 feet in diameter and more than 700 giant sequoias less than 10 feet in diameter. The largest tree in the grove has a diameter of 20 feet and is 220 feet in height. 

The grove defined by the outermost giant sequoia trees covers 341 acres.  It is estimated that the ages of larger giant sequoia trees in the grove are up to 1,500 years old.
 

Geography

Sequoia National Forest is located in the southern Sierra Nevada mountains of California. The U.S. National Forest is named for the majestic Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) trees which populate 38 distinct grooves within the boundaries of the forest

The Sequoia National Forest has 34 giant sequoia groves.

There are six wilderness areas within Sequoia NF that are part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. Some of these extend into neighboring National Forests.


  • Domeland Wilderness 
  • Golden Trout Wilderness 
  • Jennie Lakes Wilderness
  • Kiavah Wilderness 
  • Monarch Wilderness 
  • South Sierra Wilderness 

Surface

The Sequoia National Forest covers 1,193,315 acres (1,864.555 sq mi; 4,829.17 km2  Its Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) groves are part of its 196,000 acres (790 km2) of old growth forests.

Travel Suggestions

The Trail of 100 Giants is an easy, accessible walk through Long Meadow Grove, one of the premier groves of giant sequoias in the southern Sierra Nevada. The grove showcases monarchs estimated to be 1,500 years old.

About 1.3 miles of paved trail offers several loop options with interpretive signs. Located on the Western Divide Highway (Hwy 107), facilities include a paved parking area,  restrooms, picnic area and campground nearby.  A $5 per vehicle fee is charged to help maintain and improve these facilities.


California Forests

The coastal forests of Northern California are in many ways an extension of the temperate rainforests that hug the coasts in Washington and Oregon, except that, in California, redwoods and Douglas-fir - tanoak forests dominate many lowland areas. 

These ancient and spectacular conifers are among the biggest, tallest, and oldest trees in the world, often exceeding 200 ft (more than 369 ft in some individuals) in height, 15 ft in diameter, and 2,200 years old. 

Redwood groves have the greatest biomass accumulation known for any terrestrial ecosystem. They are globally unique forests, and only a few other forests in the world have a similar assemblage and structure of ancient, giant conifers, e.g., Giant Sequoia groves of the Sierra Nevada, Sitka spruce and Douglas-fir forests of the Pacific Northwest, and Alerce forests of southern Chile.

Forests an the Environment 

Around 25 percent of the CO2 that we release into the atmosphere by burning formerly buried hydrocarbons is absorbed by plants, so having more of them can help slow down (but not stop) climate change, and there’s a limit to plants' rate of absorption.


LInks

https://www.worldwildlife.org/ecoregions/na0519
http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wilderness-resources/stories/deforestation-vs-nature-the-winner-might-surprise-you#ixzz3WjnoBjIg
http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wilderness-resources/blogs/21-reasons-why-forests-are-important